Fail to Yield Right of Way to Pedestrian in Crosswalk

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Failing to yield right of way to a pedestrian in a crosswalk is considered a moving violation, and can result in serious injuries or even death.  Failure to yield is the most common cause of accidents in the US. An individual found guilty of this violation could face some heavy penalties and fines, unless they’re able to prove that they were in the right.

Fines and Penalties

Individuals who are found guilty of this violation can expect to pay a fine of no less than $100, and it could be as high as $500.  For second and third offenses, the fine can be very steep, and individuals may even spend time in jail.  Typically, the more serious the results of the failure to yield are, the higher the penalties and fines are.  For instance, if the pedestrian was injured, the fines may be higher.  There is also the chance the pedestrian could file a lawsuit.

Traffic Points and Impact on Driving Record

Individuals found guilty of failure to yield right of way to pedestrian in crosswalk can expect to have at least 2 demerit points placed on their driving record.  These points can cause several problems; if they add up too quickly, an individual can find himself or herself without a driver’s license for a period of time.  Also, they typically make the individual’s insurance premiums increase, especially if they are accumulated quickly.  This means that even after the fine has been paid, an individual will continue paying for the violation.

Hiring an Attorney

Regardless of circumstances surrounding the moving violation, individuals who must go to court should consider hiring an attorney to represent them.  Attorneys are more likely to get lesser charges, smaller fines or to even get the charges dropped.  Attorneys can gather the evidence and details of what happened and present it to the court so that their client’s side of the story gets told.  Depending upon the situation, attorneys may even be able to have the whole case dropped by proving that his or her client was actually not guilty of the moving violation at all.

 

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